Art, Atelier, Books, Contemporary Art, Estate Sales, Exhibition, Gallery, London, The Arts

By Appointment with Pedro Andrade Nunes: Artist, Investor and so much more.

 

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Hello, 2016 – acrylic on canvas 100 x 100 cm

We discovered exemplary works by Pedro Andrade Nunes via Instagram. Upon speedy inspection it is abundantly clear that art as a talent comes naturally to London/Lisbon based Pedro. From the intensity of the colours to a variety of the paintings’ subject matter – we simply had to delve further into his world.

Hints of the abstract movement are visible in many of his pieces, yet he also adds his inimitable twist, which certainly makes the audience pay attention and wonder what he has planned next…

Who do you work with?

I am working solo for now. It takes time to find the right partnerships – I am very picky regarding who I work with. However, it does not mean I will always work alone. For now, my partnerships revolve around my head, imagination and the experiences I have had in life so far.

Describe the current art industry and scene, firstly in London? What about Lisbon? How do the two compare – similarities, differences?

The industry is super matured in London – with a lot of “supply” and “demand” and a perfect match of opportunities. It has evolved to the point where the artist must step out in a very unique way and demonstrate they could make a difference. Only then they would have some kind of recognition and “enter” the close circle of art dealers and collectors. 
Lisbon is definitely an emerging market for art. It is taking the first baby steps, but demonstrating a big potential as many artists move to Lisbon with cheap rents and a vibrant environment. I would compare it to Berlin a couple of years ago. It is a market easier to get in but would definitely not boost the results (both in reputation and recognition) that London does. 

 

Which direction do you see the art industry going, in the next 5 – 10 years? How does it compare to when you started?
The industry will keep reinventing itself. I see less intermediaries along the way, with new social platforms making the exposure of an artist easier. Having said so, it will be hard to imagine a world without galleries and a strong secondary market to go with it.
It is something close to retail where we see e-commerce binding with brick and mortar and not replacing it completely. 

What are the last 3 books you read? 3 films you watched? 3 albums you streamed or podcasts downloaded? That you enjoyed. 

Books:
1. “Francis Bacon in Your Blood – A Memoir” by Michael Peppiatt
2. “Life with Picasso” by Francoise Gilot
3. “Duveen: The Story of the Most Spectacular Art Dealer of All Time” by S.N. Behrman
Movies: 
1. “Listen” – a short movie form Nicolai Mikadze (a good and talented friend of mine)
2. “Annie Hall” – I always revisit Woody Allen from time to time
3. “Dunkirk” 
Music:
1. “Songs from the Arc of Life” – Yo Yo Ma
2. “The essential Leonard Cohen” – Leonard Cohen 
3. “The flying Club Cup” – Beirut 

Favourite artist? Art movement?
It is definitely the one million dollar question. It is a cliché (they exist for a reason) to say that it is impossible to define one single artist – well I guess it is true. It is the classic question of “Who do you like most – your mother or your father?”…
I have to say Matisse, Picasso, Bacon, Buffet, Modigliani (among others). I believe the beauty of art is the unlimited choices, so I find this question castrating. Same goes with the art movement. It is a moment that is dynamic in its process – so I believe I look at art as a process of eras and moments with timeless beauty.

What is your source of inspiration? Who is your source of inspiration – personally and professionally?

My inspiration is the idiosyncrasies of life. I am not a tortured artist, I don’t live for a depression that would boost my creativity. I search for that in life with the ups and downs that go with it. We are here for a short whisper, there is no time to lose. Inspiration cannot exist without life, I believe art is life and therefore all my experiences, the people I have met, the nights I haven’t slept, the days I was not awake – all come together in my paintings. Human nature amuses me, I like to “read” people and understand the fragility. We are all struggling here, but in a humorous way – and I like that dimension in us. Some people living in a blue planet in an everlasting universe – can you see how idiosyncratic this is? 


What motivates you to stay in this role/industry? Perhaps a better question is, what motivates you to keep painting and creating works of art?

I paint because I could not paint.

You can follow Pedro on Instagram here  or his website here to see more about him and his work.